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Full text of "microcomputerAssociates :: Microcomputer Digest v01n12 Jun75"

Copyright ©1975 by 
Microcomputer Associates Inc. 
Printed in U.S.A. 



DIGEST 



Volume 1, Number 12 



Motorola To Introduce 4-Bit ECL jjC 

Motorola Semiconductor is now working on a 
new ECL/LSI microcomputer chip set that will 
be aimed at both the microcomputer and main- 
frame computer market. 

Irwin Carroll, spokesman for Motorola's 
Technical Communications Group, said the five 
chip system has a "target introduction date 
set for the first quarter, 1976." The MC- 
10800 is a 4-bit slice microprocessor that 
will be expandable up to 64-bits or more. 

(cont'd on page 2) 

TI Confirms 8080 Second Source Plans 

Texas Instruments has confirmed that they 
will indeed second-source Intel's 8080 micro- 
processor. Parts will be available at TI's 
distributors later this month in 50-piece 
quantities and volume production of the micro- 
processor is scheduled for the third quarter. 
The announcement was made by Ed Huber, TI's 
MOS marketing manager based in Houston. 

(cont'd on page 2) 

Inside This Issue 

ELECTRONIC WARFARE-- First of a three part 
series discussing uP in EW. See page M-. 

MICROCOMPUTER MANUFACTURERS chose NCC to dis- 
play their new products. Story on page 5. 

NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR bidding for top uC mar- 
keting spot. Story on page 10. 

SIX VOLUME self -teaching microcomputer course. 
Story on page 13. 

COURSES: Upcoming microcomputer courses for 
July, August and September on page 15. 

1976 MICROCOMPUTER MARKET predicted to reach 
$120 million. Story on page 17. 

MICROCOMPUTER STUDIES AVAILABLE on page 19. 



June, 1975 



Mostek & Fairchild Enter F8 Pact 

Fairchild's Integrated Circuits Group and 
Mostek Corp. have jointly announced that Mos- 
tek will second source Fairchild's F8 micro- 
processor set. Mostek will supply the com- 
plete five-circuit F8 family, including the 
CPU, ROM, dynamic and static memory interface 
and DMA circuits. In addition, Mostek will 



second source the 3538. 
for use with the F8. 



a 256 x 4 RAM suitable 
(cont'd on page 3) 



NSC Enters Low-Cost juP Arena 

National Semiconductor Corp. has entered 
the market for low-cost microprocessors with 
a 4-bit machine that it calls "FIPS" for 
Four-Bit Integrated Processor System, accord- 
ing to Hash Patel, product marketing manager. 

The FIPS machine, designed as a pin-for- 
pin replacement for the vintage MCS-4 micro- 
processor system produced by Intel, features 
a central processing unit (CPU) that sells 
for less than $10. Power dissipation is typ- 
ically 20% lower than that of the MCS-4-. 

(cont'd on page 3) 

Intellec MDS Introduced At NCC 

(FIFTH IN A SERIES) 

Intel Corp. took the wraps off their first 
in-circuit microcomputer development system, 
the Intellec MDS, at the NCC Conference. 

The system's multiprocessor configuration 
allows the implementation of designs based on 
the Intel 8080 or Series 3000 microcomputers. 
An internal 8080 microprocessor controls and 
supervises all system resources, while a sec- 
ond processor, an In-Circuit Emulator called 
ICE, is plugged directly into the user's sys- 
tem for further hardware and software checkout. 

ICE-80 for 8080 based systems and ICE-30 
for the Series 3000 bipolar microcomputer set 
are used to control, interrogate, revise and 

(cont'd on page 3) 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

SPECIAL FEATURES Page 

Motorola To Introduce 4-Bit ECL uC 1 

TI Confirms 8080 Second Source Plans ... 1 

Mostek £ Fairchild Enter F8 Pact 1 

NSC Enters Low-Cost uP Arena 1 

Intellec MDS Introduced At NCC 1 

uP In Electronic Warfare Systems 4 

First West Coast NCC Nets 30,000 5 

TECHNOLOGY 

uC's Are Instruction Sensitive 6 

GEC And Intel In Close Relationship 6 

MICROCOMPUTER-BASED PRODUCTS 

Chrysler Orders 5000 M6800s 6 

PACE Development System £ IMP Kits 7 

Distributed Data Processing System 7 

Three uP Boards Introduced 7 

Intelligent Floppy Disc System 8 

Microcomputer Teaching Kit 8 

Bourns To Use uC In Terminal 8 

Data Communications Controller 8 

8080 Slated For Process Control 9 

MEMORIES AND PERIPHERALS 

Saga Of The 4K RAM 9 

Logic Analyzer And Clocks For uP 9 

4K and 8K PROM Slated For uC Market 9 

Microcomputer UART Unveiled 10 

National Bids For Number 1 Spot 10 

New Macro Assembler For 8008/8080 ...... 10 

Rockwell £ Synertek Reach Agreement .... 11 

Washington uC Development Center 11 

Process Control Compiler 11 

Memory And LSI Chip Test System 11 

New Back-Up Memory Assures Data 12 

First Of New FPLA Generation 12 

PEOPLE, LITERATURE AND EVENTS 

Calif. Consultant Trade Association .... 12 

People On The Move 12 

Mits-Mobile Tours West Coast 13 

WESC0N 80 Per Cent Sold 13 

Six Volume uC Course Available 13 

Recent Literature 13 

EDUCATION 

Microcomputer Courses, Seminars and 
Conferences For July thru September .... 15 

FINANCIAL 

Earnings 17 

1976 uC Market To Reach $120 Million ... 17 

Shugart £ National In Disc Deal 17 

CA Slash Memory £ uP Prices ........ 17 

COMPANY ADDRESSES FOR THIS ISSUE 18 



Page 

MICROCOMPUTER STUDIES AVAILABLE 19 

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES 19 

MICROCOMPUTER PRODUCTS/SERVICES 19 

special features : 

Motorola To Introduce 4-Bit Slice jjC 

(from page 1) 

The five chips will consist of an MC-10800 
4-bit slice microprocessor, MC-10801 Control 
Register chip, MC-10802 Timing Function chip, 
MC-10803 Slice/Memory Interface device, and 
the MC-10804 Slice Look Ahead device. 

Carroll said a new feature of the system, 
parity check, had been added because of the 
many requests by customers for such capability 
in a microcomputer. He estimates the ECL 
system's typical execution speed for one mi- 
croinstruction cycle to be around 75 ns. The 
instruction set will consist of 70 commands 
and the microprocessor will be user micropro- 
grammable to allow the customers to configure 
the system around their current software 
packages . 

Carroll said that pricing had not yet been 
established. 

TI Confirms 8080 Second Source Plans 

(from page 1) 

According to Huber, the TMS 8080 design 
is complete and characterization tests have 
been underway for some time . The TMS 8080 
is reportedly the first in a new line of 
microprocessor products . Besides the 8080, 
TI is producing a 4-bit P-channel micropro- 
cessor, the TMS 1000, and is said to be sam- 
pling the SBP0400 CPU. The TMS 1000 will 
be used in dedicated control applications . 

Spokesman for Motorola Semiconductor felt 
that TI • s announcement would impact the mi- 
croprocessor market in the 8080 's favor but 
noted that Motorola would soon respond with 
a "couple of things" of equal impact. In- 
dustry sources have speculated that an Ameri- 
can and/or a European firm may soon announce 
a decision to second source Motorola's 6800. 

Advanced Micro Devices reports that they 
are still planning to have their 8080 mil-spec 
microprocessor available within a month. 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408) 247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



Mostek & Fairchild Enter F8 Pact 

(from page 1) 

The alternate source agreement includes 
exchange of masks, manufacturing and applica- 
tions software and applications hardware. In 
addition, both firms will cooperate in ex- 
panding current F8 hardware, software and 
support programs, as well as in developing 
new F8 components . 

Dr. Thomas A. Longo, Fairchild 's vice- 
president and general manager, said, "Mostek's 
N-channel Isoplanar processing is completely 
compatible with ours, and the tooling is in- 
terchangeable. Specifications for the F8 
parts will be identical whether supplied by 
Fairchild or by Mostek." 

The F8 (see MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST, April, 
1975) is aimed primarily at the controller 
market, however, L. J. Sevin, Mostek's presi- 
dent, said a major reason for Mostek's deci- 
sion to second source the F8 rather than 
other designs is the F8's ability to cover a 
broad range of applications. 

Mostek expects to have samples of the F8 
circuits available for marketing late this 
summer . 

NSC Enters Low-Cost jjP Arena 

(from page 1) 

The FIPS microprocessor is a general-pur- 
pose chip set intended for use in process 
control , numerical control , measuring instru- 
ments, traffic signal systems, and intelli- 
gent terminals. 

Patel said that National sees the micro- 
processor market branching in two main direc- 
tions. One is to high speed, high powered, 
minicomputer oriented systems and the other 
to small, low cost, dedicated control proces- 
sors . 

According to Patel, the FIPS microproces- 
sor is extremely cost-effective in control 
applications because it easily interfaces 
with keyboards, switches, displays, and other 
peripheral devices. 

The FIPS chip set consists of a 4-bit CPU 
(INS4004), a 256 x 8 mask-programmed ROM com- 
bined with a 4-bit I/O port (INS4001), a 320- 
bit RAM with a 4-bit output port (INS4002), 
and a 10-bit serial- in parallel-out shift 



Volume 1, Number 12/ June, 1975 



register (INS4003). 

An 8-bit address latch memory interface 
(INS4008), and 8-bit instruction and I/O 
transfer device (INS4009), are included in 
the chip set. Together they permit the use 
of standard MM1702AQ 256 x 8 bit erasable 
PROMs . 

The INS4004 CPU contains all of the con- 
trol logic needed to request, decode, and 
execute the program instructions stored in 
the program memory. The chip also consists 
of a 4-bit arithmetic logic unit, 16 4-bit 
index registers, a 12-bit program counter 
with a three-level stack, and miscellaneous 
control logic. Communication with the other 
chips in the system is accomplished over a 
time-multiplexed 4-bit data bus. 

The INS4001 ROMs, which store the uC's 
instructions, are arranged in banks of six- 
teen. Switching between banks is done under 
control of the program, with the CPU selec- ' 
tively enabling the appropriate bank of ROMs 
to fetch an instruction. 

All the chips are available now in produc- 
tion quantities and prices in lots of 100 are 
as follows : 

INS4001 256 x 8 ROM £ 4-bit I/O port ..$9.95 
INS4002 32-bit RAM £ 4-bit I/O port ... 9.95 
INS4003 1-bit serial shift register ... 3.95 

INS4004 4-bit CPU 9.95 

INS4008 8-bit address latch, interface . 7.50 
INS4009 8-bit instruction £ I/O 

transfer port 7.50 

Intellec MDS Introduced At NCC 

(from page 1) 

completely debug a user's system in its own 

environment . 

The MDS is a modular system whereby users 
can update their system with peripherals and 
options as needed. These include the Intellec 
MDS, ICE, a complete Diskette Operating Sys- 
tem, a universal PROM programmer, a system 
console , a line printer and appropriate mem- 
ory and I/O options . 

The basic system includes an 8080 micro- 
processor, 16K RAM, 2K ROM, 256-bytes of 
PROM, and hardware interfaces for a teletype- 
writer, CRT, line printer, high-speed paper 
tape punch, and Universal PROM programmer. 
MDS features include a 2 us instruction cycle, 
^___ (cont'd next page) 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., AM Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technicaf Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



unlimited subroutine nesting, a 78 command 
instruction set, an 8- level nested priority 
interrupt structure, and full DMA capability. 

Memory can be expanded to 64-K bytes by 
adding 16K RAM or 5K PROM modules. Customized 
I/O requirements are satisfied by adding gen- 
eral-purpose I/O modules containing four 8- 
bit input ports, four 8-bit output ports and 
eight system interrupt lines . 

DMA modules allow maximum efficiency of 
data transfers between the MDS memory and 
selected I/O devices. A universal bus and 
independent bus clock support multi-processor 
configurations that are not limited to any 
one Intel microcomputer family. 

According to Intel, the single feature 
providing the greatest ease and versatility 
in developing products, and the heart of the 
multi-processor system configuration is the 
In- Circuit Emulator (ICE). 

As soon as the user has determined the 
microprocessor and bus structure, the ICE can 
be plugged into the user's system in lieu of 
the microprocessor. ICE controls and inter- 
rogates the system in real-time operation, 
reducing the total debug time considerably. 

ICE provides hardware breakpoints to sus- 
pend program execution for examination and 
modification of memory and internal registers. 
A single-step capability enables information 
to be stored or displayed at intermediate 
states within an instruction cycle. The pro- 
gram flow can be dynamically traced while 
operating in real-time, displaying previously 
executed instructions with corresponding data 
and address bus contents, as well as the sys- 
tem status. The user's system can be operat- 
ing with its I/O under ICE control, stopping 
at designated points for examination. 

Prices start at $3995 with $1000 allowed 
for trade-in on your In telle c 8 /Mod 80. 

jjP In Electronic Warfare Systems 

(FIRST IN A THREE- PART SERIES) 
By H. Dean McKay, President, A H Systems 

This series will examine the potentially 
rich application area of using microproces- 
sors in electronic warfare (EW) systems. The 
purpose of EW processor systems will be ana- 
lyzed along with many of the problems en- 
countered in implementing such systems. Fi- 
nally, the design of several EW systems uti- 
lizing microprocessors will be described. 



Electronic warfare is one of the fastest 
growing segments of the military electronics 
industry today. Its growth arises from the 
increased threat, demand and the deployment 
of more sophisticated communications, weap- 
ons and countermeasure systems. There is a 
basic requirement to increase the level of 
intelligence of the individual components of 
the EW system, i.e., receiver, signal pro- 
cessor, signal recognizer, jammer, antenna 
array, etc. All of these systems demand 
highly efficient telecommunications between 
remote locations and a central processor. 
Transferring information by a telecommunica- 
tions system between a remote location and a 
central processor does not consist of merely 
plugging in the remote unit to a computer 
output port. 

There are more demanding essential require- 
ments that are particularly difficult, such 
as high speed signal processing requirements, 
that can't be handled over conventional data 
links. This is where the microprocessor will 
make significant improvements in current and 
future EW systems . 

Probably the most important of all reasons 
for utilizing micros in EW systems in in- 
creased operational capability. Electronic 
warfare hardware is in a dynamic environment, 
that is, the threat is continually changing. 
It is desirable to have EW systems that both 
meet today's threat and are capable of being 
upgraded for future threat requirements. The 
microprocessor is ideally suited to provide 
this capability. 

The microprocessor can be used as a basic 
subsystem controller with stored programs for 
current assessed threats. As a future threat 
is identified the particular system capabili- 
ty can be increased by changing only the sys- 
tem or subsystem software rather than rede- 
signing the hardware system. This allows an 
extremely flexible operational system. It is 
simply a matter of re -programming PROMs and 
a receiver can be changed from a monitoring 
receiver to a search and acquisition receiver, 
or a communications jammer could be changed 
to a radar jammer. 

This flexibility is probably most impor- 
tant in electronic warfare because quick re- 
action is a basic axiom of the EW user. In 
addition to increased capability and flexi- 
bility, the classical factors of size, weight 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



and power are important. The fact that mi- 
croprocessors are , LSI devices make them ideal 
for small size, light weight, low power sys- 
tems, particularly utilizing the new techno- 
logies of CMOS/SOS and I 2 L. Both of these 
technologies have the speed requirements 
while being several orders of magnitude lower 
in power than current TTL 

Another reason for using microprocessors 
in EW systems is that they are a good match 
to RF subsystems. One must often wait for 
the receiver IF to settle or the jammer syn- 
thesizer to slow to a new frequency. These 
waiting times normally bog down large pro- 
cessors and are difficult to handle in hard- 
wired systems. However, the micro with cycle 
times in the 200 ns to 1 us range are ideally 
suited for controlling RF elements. The cost 
of the microprocessor is low, making it vi- 
able as an element for control of almost 
every major subsystem in EW systems. 

(Next month Mr. McKay will discuss typical 
applications for microprocessors in EW sys- 
tems . ) 

First West Coast NCC Nets 30,000 

Challenges In The New Era was the major 
theme of the Conference Program for the 1975 
National Computer Conference £ Exposition 
held from May 19-22 at the Anaheim Conven- 
tion Center. The conference's 89 technical 
programs analyzed issues facing the computer 
industry and data processing users in science 
and technology , methods and applications , and 
interaction with society. The microprocessor 
sessions were organized by Ted Laliotis of 
Fairchild System Technology. 

Virtually every segment of data processing 
technology and related services was repre- 
sented by the 274 organizations that occupied 
795 booths. 

On the floor, a large variety of microcom- 
puter-based products were displayed including 
Intel's new Intellec MDS, the new microcom- 
puter development system for their Series 
3000 bipolar microprocessor and DCC's 16-bit 
minicomputer implemented with the 3000 bipo- 
lar chip set (see MDS article, this issue, 
page 1). 

National Semiconductor demonstrated their 
line of microprocessors, memories and had a 
hands-on demonstration model of the PACE 



microcomputer system. 

Danyl Corp. displayed their accessory 
items for the National IMP-16C microproces- 
sors which included a 4K x 18 RAM/2K x 16 
PROM module,. 

Applied Data Communications exhibited 
their Series 70 Microcomputer System which 
uses an 8080 microprocessor. Included in 
the basic unit is an operator terminal con- 
troller, UK RAM, IK PROM, autostart bootstrap, 
and a floppy disc controller. 

The Spintronic data communications termi- 
nal from Intertec Data Systems featured an 
8-bit microprocessor., Diablo HyType character 
printer, IBM Selectric keyboard, and 4 to 6K 
memory . 

Pro-Log demonstrated their new 8811 CPU 
card containing the 8080 microprocessor and 
associated circuitry. Also on display were 
the PLS-441 and PLS-442 4040 microprocessor 
cards . 

The MPA-1 Logic Analyzer, a diagnostic 
tool for hardware and software operations of 
microprocessors was featured by Motorola Inc. 
along with the entire M6800 microcomputer 
family . 

Ontel Corp. showed their user-programmable 
intelligent terminal system, OP-1. The ter- 
minal features three microprocessors (CPU, 
display and I/O). The system can -operate in 
a stand-alone or online environment. 

A high-speed dot matrix microprocessor- 
controlled printer was shown by Applied Com- 
puting Technology. Standard features include 
132 columns, multiple copies, horizontal tab, 
vertical formatting and forward-reverse line 
feed. 

Conrac Corp. displayed their first CRT 
computer terminal in a new series of compat- 
ible units. The terminal is based on a mi- 
croprocessor concept that allows most of the 
terminal's characteristics to be reprogrammed 
through PROM changes. The 480/25 is fully 
TTY compatible, and has full edit capability 
with optional keyboard configuration. 

Microprocessor family boards holding 4K 
RAMs, 40-pin microprocessor, and 28 pin I/O 
chips were exhibited by the Electronic Engi- 
neering Company of California. 

The Hydra Corp. demonstrated their medium 
speed matrix printer whose printing mechanism 
and data format are controlled by a built-in 
(cont'd next page) 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408) 247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technicat Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



microprocessor. Model-B prints bidirection- 
ally at 80 cps to provide 85 lpm throughput. 

Mits, Inc. demonstrated their Altair 8800 
microcomputer kit and had their Mits-Mobile 
van on display. The van is fully equipped 
with the entire Altair product line. 

The MSC8080 microcomputer system, a single 
board assembly, was displayed by Monolithic 
Systems Corp. The board is designed to mate 
the Intel 8080 microprocessor to the Mono- 
store family of semiconductor memory systems. 

Sord Computer Systems, Inc. demonstrated 
their SMP80, an 8080-based microcomputer that 
is a complete software development system. 
Software support includes assembler (cross 
and resident) . editor, debugger, IOX, FDOS, 
Mult i- Task Monitor, and various kinds of di- 
agnostics. Sord says they can provide a cus- 
tom designed microcomputer, including system 
software, using any kind of microprocessor 
chip.. 

The 3800 Flexible Floppy Disc Subsystem 
that can be interfaced to minicomputers and 
microcomputers was shown by Shugart Asso- 
ciates. Features include double density 
capability, single PCB controller, IBM 37H0 
compatibility option, and simplified control 
interfacing. 

technology 

jjC's Are Instruction Sensitive 

Microprocessors are definitely instruction 
sensitive according to Dr. William C. W. Mow, 
president of Macrodata, an LSI test system 
manufacturer. In an interview with Electron- 
ic Engineering Times (EET), Dr. Mow explained, 
"Through the use of a technique called diag- 
nostic emulation, which tests the CPU with 
its operating instructions, we can show con- 
clusively that microprocessors are instruc- 
tion sensitive." 

According to Macrodata' s test results, 
the sensitivity occurs during the jump, in- 
terrupt and scratchpad memory instructions. 
Simple instructions do not seem to be affected 
at all. Dr. Mow said that the sensitivity 
is comparable to the pattern sensitivity 
found in M0S memories. 

The cause of the problems is believed to 
lie in the fabrication process of micropro- 
cessor wafers. Investigations by Macrodata 



point to the charge storage effects associated 
with all MOS/LSI devices, especially in mem- 
ories . 

Dr. Mow feels that if manufacturers were 
to perform exhaustive instruction sensitivity 
tests on microprocessors their cost would be 
prohibitive. He therefore suggests that 
users "set-up microprocessor tests using in- 
struction sequences in an environment similar 
to the one anticipated. By introducing suf- 
ficient guard bands for supply voltages and 
varying timing signals and dc parameters to 
the limits expected in the actual system, 
the limits of reliable performance can then 
be determined." 

GEC And Intel In Close Relationship 

GEC Semiconductor in Wembley, England, has 
signed a distribution agreement with Intel 
covering all Intel microprocessor products. 

At the same time GEC has introduced three 
devices for use with Intel's 8080 micropro- 
cessor. They include an asynchronous bi-di- 
rectional 1/0 buffer and two versions of a 
chip that give the 8080 a direct multiply 
capability. It was also learned that an in- 
cremental divider for the 8080 is under de- 
velopment . 

The signing of this agreement between GEC 
and Intel has given rise to speculation that 
GEC may soon be manufacturing the 8080 in 
England. Two recent developments give fur- 
ther credence to such speculation. First, 
new test equipment had been installed at the 
Wembley plant that gives the firm the capa- 
bility of testing the 8080 in both wafer and 
packaged form. Second, Intel would probably 
not be able to effectively enter the coveted 
UK defense and telecommunications market 
without a European manufacturing base . 

MICROCOMPUTER-BASED PRODUCTS 

Chrysler Orders 5000 M6800s 

Motorola Semiconductor reports that they 
have received their second M6800 micropro- 
cessor order from Chrysler's Huntsville divi- 
sion. The microprocessors are slated for use 
in Electronic Spark Advance (ESA) diagnostic 
equipment. Of the 5,000 chips in the order, 
2,000 are expected to be incorporated into 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



test equipment for Chrysler dealers by year 
end. 

According to a spokesman from the auto 
firm, Chrysler chose the microprocessor over 
hardwired logic as it would easily enable the 
company to update the test equipment for new- 
er engines. 

Sensing the spark advance is accomplished 
using a flip-flop that is set by a slot in 
the rotating engine damper and reset by the 
primary of the ignition coil. The number of 
sets and resets are then stored in two dif- 
ferent microprocessor registers to determine 
the set/reset timing ratio. This information 
allows the M6800 to calculate the time dif- 
ferential within a fraction of one degree be- 
tween spark and engine rotation. 

PACE Development Systems & IMP Kits 

National Semiconductor has begun deliveries 
of their PACE Development System, a hardware 
prototyping system designed to aid in the 
development of interfaces and software for 
the PACE microprocessor. 

Fashioned after the IMP-16P model, the 
PACE system includes power supply, memory, 
interface provisions, sockets for PROMs and 
other elements for writing and debugging pro- 
grams . 

Each unit is priced at $3850 and National 
says deliveries are now running about four 
weeks, however, the firm is expected to have 
the systems available from stock within a 
month . 

In another move, National has reviewed its 
packaging policy for its IMP microprocessors, 
giving distributors the green light to offer 
the MPU and interface circuits as a kit. The 
move affects the I MP- 4, -8 and -16 micropro- 
cessors. 

The following sets are now available from 
distributors with the first price indicating 
quantities of 1-24 and the second 25 and up. 
*IMP-4: MPU, RALU, CROM and FILU set 

$105, $83 
*IMP-8: MPU, 2-RALUs, CROM and FILU set 

$203, $162 

*IMP-16: MPU, 4-RALUs, CROM 

$330, $198 

Hamilton/Avnet , the Wyle Group, Hall-Mark, 
Kierulff , Harvey, and Semiconductor Concepts 
are among distributors now offering the kits. 



Distributed Data Processing System 

A new distributed data processing system, 
the DXS Data Exchange System, featuring a 
microcomputer- controlled video terminal has 
been announced by the Digital Systems Divi- 
sion of Texas Instruments Inc. 

The DXS is an expandable and flexible 
transaction processing system for distributed 
data base networks, and uses TI Model 960B 
minicomputers for transaction processing and 
disc file management, terminal communications, 
and optional host interface. An important 
feature of the system is the new Model 914A 
video terminal which enables stand-alone 
transaction processing or communication to 
360/370 host systems. The 914A terminal pro- 
vides 3270 emulation, as well as programmabil- 
ity for intelligent data entry, inquiry and 
programmed keyboard functions with its built- 
in microprocessor. 

The terminal incorporates a microprocessor 
with 8K bytes of memory for intelligent data 
entry and inquiry response to DXS or host 
360/370 data files with full 3270/2260 emula- 
tion. The 1920-character screen provides 
programmable field formats, protected and 
non-protected fields, and a complete range 
of field editing functions to minimize data 
entry errors and reduce the data to be trans- 
mitted. An optional parallel printer inter- 
face enables direct connection to 80 or 132- 
column printers. 

The 914A terminal is priced at $3200 in 
single unit quantity and quantity discounts 
are available. 

Three jjP Boards Introduced 

Pro-Log Corp. has announced three new mi- 
crocomputer boards for use in dedicated con- 
trol and data processing applications . 

Model PLS-441 includes the Intel 4040 li- 
bit microprocessor, crystal clock, external 
and power on reset interrupt, 256-word in- 
struction PROM expandable to 1024 words, and 
an 80 character data RAM with capacity to 
320 characters. I/O lines for the 441 in- 
clude 16 TTL inputs, 16 TTL outputs, and 
four MOS output lines. 

The Model PLS-442 is identical to the 441 

(cont'd next page) 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408) 247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



8 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



except that the instruction PROM is expand- 
able to 1536 words and the board has 32 field 
selectable TTL I/O lines with expandability 
to 128 lines. 

The 8811 CPU board incorporates the Intel 
8080 microprocessor and is fully compatible 
with the ROM, RAM, and I/O cards used with 
the 8111 (8008) CPU card. The basic clock 
time for the 8811 is 1.6 us, but the clock 
can easily be changed on the CPU card to . 8 
us. 

Prices are $345 for the PLS-441, $445 for 
the PLS-442, and $490 for the 8811. 

Intelligent Floppy Disc System 

Applied Data Communications has introduced 
their Series 62 Intelligent Floppy Disc Sys- 
tem for use in intelligent and remote batch 
communications systems . The 8080 microcom- 
puter-based system is programmable and pro- 
vides terminal storage and peripheral control 
functions . 

The system features from one to eight IBM 
compatible floppy disc drives, 4K RAM, IK 
PROM with 256-word boot, and ASCII controller 
(TTY current- loop selectable). 

The basic system is housed in a tabletop 
enclosure with one or two floppy disc drives, 
power supplies, disc format electronics board 
and microcomputer board. Up to 4K PROM and 
up to 16K RAM are included on the microcom- 
puter board along with the asynchronous con- 
troller and the floppy disc DMA controller. 
Another board houses the disc format elec- 
tronics to provide IBM 3740 disc compatibil- 
ity, and an optional memory board allows ex- 
pansion up to 64K of combined RAM and ROM. 

A control panel and keyboard allows the 
system to be used for dedicated functions 
such as offline print /plot, data entry, data 
communications and buffering, test and con- 
trol, and word processing. The Series 62 
can support more sophisticated applications 
by using more complex consoles. 

Available software includes driver hand- 
lers, utility programs, diagnostics, editor, 
assembler, boot loader and monitor. Programs 
can be assembled onto disc and manipulated by 
file name using an optional disc operating 
system . 

# # # # 



Microcomputer Teaching Kit 

E £ L Instruments has announced their lat- 
est Intel 8080-based microcomputer for teach- 
ing software and hardware design. The system 
features a CPU interface, a memory card ex- 
pandable to 3K RAM and IK R0M/PR0M, a front 
panel, and an interface board capable of 
handling 12 IC's. 

Program access is through the front panel, 
but since there is no PROM memory in the 
front-panel control loop, diagnostic software 
routines for dubugging have to be accessed 
through a teletype or similar I/O. 

The system's 72-pin bus structure is con- 
figured so that no special bus expanders , 
converters or interfaces are necessary. 

Software support includes a teletype debug 
package (in PROM) for changing data, examin- 
ing a location, setting a break point, and 
beginning a program. Commonly used subrou- 
tines such as teletype, 1/0, punch I/O, BCD 
binary conversion and time delay loops have 
also been preprogrammed in PROM. 

Bourns To Use jjC In Terminal 

Bourns Inc. is heavily investigating the 
use of microprocessors in their planned line 
of custom intelligent data entry terminals. 
Sources within the company say one such sys- 
tem using a 16-bit microprocessor could be 
ready by the end of 1975. However, they 
declined to further identify the system. 

Data Communications Controller 

Pulsecom's Micromite-400 is a modular data 
communications control unit which includes a 
system control module containing a micropro- 
cessor, the Intel 8008, to execute a series 
of data communications and/or terminal pro- 
cedures which are stored in various memory 
devices. The module also includes memory 
devices which may be used as temporary data 
or message storage for processing or buffer- 
ing purposes . 

Line and terminal interfaces are accom- 
plished by adding line and/or terminal inter- 
face modules as needed. Both EIA and TTY 
interfaces are available . The resulting sys- 
tem can be used to control the flow of data 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



Volume 1, Number 12/ June, 1975 



communication between lines and/or terminals. 
For instance, the M-400 could conceivably al- 
low data communication between two or more 
lines of different speeds or protocols, a 
line and a terminal as a selector, or between 
terminals of different types. 

8080 Slated For Process Control 

The Intel 8080 microcomputer has been de- 
signated the candidate for use in Bell £ 
Howell's new PDQ 200 digital control system 
for process control applications. 

The microcomputer will process analog and 
binary input signals back to the output bus 
for control of the process. The PDQ 200 will 
perform the mathematical computations and 
process control equations found in large com- 
puters and is also compatible with several 
other computers, printers, external storage 
and input devices. 

A two- mode PDQ 200 featuring eight analog 
inputs, four analog outputs, eight contact 
closure inputs, four contact closure outputs 
and control panel is priced at less than 
$12,000. Delivery is 30 days after receipt 
of order. 

memories and peripherals ; 
Saga Of The 4K RAM 

Back in 1972, Intel introduced the first 
4096-bit RAM, a 22-pin version. But things 
didn't settle for long. Texas Instruments 
quickly followed with their 22-pin device, 
but with a new pin-configuration. Intel must 
have liked TI's layout, for they quickly 
adopted the pin-out in a new version. 

The industry was just relaxing when Moto- 
rola and American Microsystems decided to 
announce their jointly produced 22-pin RAM. 
Of course, it had a new pin configuration. 
And to make matters a little more confusing, 
Mostek chose to unveil their small 16-pin^ 
4K RAM. The device was somewhat limited in 
speed and needed to be multiplexed, but no 
one seemed to mind. Peripheral and computer 
mainframe manufacturers quickly endorsed the 
RAM, and Fairchild, Motorola, AMI and Intel 
soon announced interchangeable 16-pin ver- 
sions . 

Believing that the pin battle was over, 



industry was in for another surprise when TI 
announced a third package size, an 18-pin 4K 
RAM that needed no multiplexing. Well, be- 
fore you could shout 'gotcha' , National Semi- 
conductor displayed their 18-pin beauty and, 
of course, it had another pin-out configura- 
tion . 

So instead of an industry standard, there 
are now five different 4K RAMs with three 
different package pin counts and five differ- 
ent pin configurations. 

Last, but not least, Intersil and Signe- 
tics say they are going to build 18-pin 4K 
RAMs. And now, the $64K question ? 

Logic Analyzer And Clocks For jjP 

Motorola has announced a completely new 
microprocessor diagnostic tool to analyze 
both hardware and software operations. 

The MPA-1 logic analyzer will display 32 
consecutive addresses and associated data. 
The display can be set to start or end with 
the trigger address, which can also be de- 
layed. The trigger can be set on any loca- 
tion within 65K addresses. 

The analyzer's CRT unit displays 32 words 
of 24 bits each in hexadecimal characters on 
a nine-inch screen. The characters are ar- 
ranged in groups of four and two, represent- 
ing a 16-bit address and eight data bits. 

Motorola has not yet announced prices or 
delivery times. 

Motorola also introduced two new clock 
circuits for use with microprocessors. The 
model K117A is designed to drive the Intel 
8080 and the MC 6970A is designed for Moto- . 
rola's M6800 microprocessor. 

Each module contains the crystal, oscilla- 
tor circuit, NMOS and TTL drivers, waveshap- 
ing and interface circuitry. The clocks pro- 
vide non- overlapping , two phase waveforms 
for the respective microprocessors. 

The price for each clock circuit is $68.13 
and delivery is from stock to 4 weeks. 

4K And 8K PROM Slated For jljC Market 

Intel is now offering their first 8K and 
a new 4K erasable PROM. The new 24-pin mem- 
ory devices were designed with a faster ac- 
cess time to match the speed of the latest 
microcomputers ■ (cont'd next page) 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technicaf Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



10 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



The C2708 8192-bit PROM is organized in a 
1024 x 8 format, while the 02704 4096-bit 
memory is configured as a 512 x 8 device. 
Worst case access times of 500 ns are guaran- 
teed over the 0° to 70°C temperature range. 

All devices are available from stock at 
Intel distributors. Prices vary according to 
access time requirements, but the 8K C2708 
price ranges from $53.05 to $65.50 each in 
100 to 999 lots. Free programming is normal- 
ly available from distributors for prototype 
quantities, but Intel reports they will pro- 
vide a programmer for orders of 10,000 or 
more units. 

Microcomputer UART Unveiled 

Guili Microprocessing Inc. has announced 
their new Model 412, CMOS universal asynchro- 
nous receiver and transmitter. The unit per- 
forms serial to parallel conversions to in- 
terface microprocessors with conventional 
modems for communications. 

The UART board has pin selectable baud 
rates from 75 to 9600 baud. CMOS inputs and 
tri- state TTL outputs reduce power consumption 
significantly. The board's versatility and 
flexibility is enhanced by the unit's EIA 
and teletype compatible outputs, half or full 
duplex operation, and the three serial inter- 
faces . 

National Bids For Number 1 Spot 

As part of National Semiconductor's bid 
for the number one spot in the microcomputer 
marketplace, several new developments have 
taken place in recent weeks. 

First, a compiler for the IMP-16 micropro- 
cessor is under development with availabil- 
ity planned for next month. The resident 
compiler uses a new language developed by 
National, SM/PL (pronounced 'simple'). The 
language will be modified for the 16-bit 
PACE chip at a later date . Phil Roybal , pro- 
duct marketing manager, microprocessors, con- 
siders SM/PL a very powerful answer to Intel's 
PL/M high level language for microcomputers . 

A- second new product is a floating-point 
math library that offers both single and 
double precision arithmetic for number crunch- 
ing applications. 

A new instruction set, POWR I/O, has been 



developed for the IMP-16 that allows the mi- 
croprocessor to perform block transfers in 
and out, memory-search for a character, and 
data stack, store or reclaim with a single 
instruction. 

It was also learned that National has 
reached a royalty- to- National agreement with 
GE Timesharing for a MACRO Expander package 
for IMP-16 microprocessors. This will allow 
IMP-16 users to begin software development 
of their products while awaiting deliveries 
of the microprocessor chips. 

National also has a new conversational 
assembler that is effectively a text editor 
and relocating assembler in one package. With 
the assembler, users will be able to create 
source code, store it in memory, edit, assem- 
ble and re-edit without using paper tape. 

In the low end microprocessor area, Na- 
tional recently announced a 4-bit chip set, 
compatible with the Intel MCS-4 family (see 
story, this issue, page 1). 

New Macro Assembler For 8008/8080 

Zeno Systems Inc. has introduced a com- 
bined macro cross-assembler for use on the- 
Intel 8008 and 8080 microprocessors. The 
assembler is written in the Macro-10 assem- 
bler language for the PDP-10 computer. ZSI 
says they will have an IBM 360/370 assembly 
version ready soon. 

The ZSI cross-assembler is available in 
either a batch version or as a conversation- 
al program for a time-sharing system. 

The package is functionally equivalent to 
the software provided by Intel, however, ex- 
tra features have been added . These include 
octal, decimal and hexadecimal listing of 
the assembler, numbering of every statement 
on the listing, refined user interface, and 
error messages that reference exact statement 
numbers . 

ZSI has priced the package at $3750 under 
a one-time licensing agreement or be utilized 
on a pay-as-you-go basis on a time-sharing 
network . 

# # # # 

Renew your subscription to MICROCOMPUTER 
DIGEST today at our new low rates of $28. 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

*of « r i 9ht ® 1975 by Microcom P uter Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



11 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



Rockwell & Synertek Reach Agreement 

In January of this year, Rockwell Inter- 
national Corp. signaled its entry into the 
standard memory marketplace by announcing 
the appointment of Adrian C. Bos, a 20-year 
veteran of the computer industry, as direc- 
tor of Memory Products Marketing for its 
Microelectronic Device Division. Simulta- 
neously, the company offered as its initial 
product, a low-priced 1103A metal gate P- , 
1 channel IK RAM with a 205 ns access time. 

Rockwell has disclosed further details of 
its standard memory marketing plans. Under 
a licensing agreement with Synertek, Rockwell 
will produce and market worldwide, Synertek' s 
1103A-1 and -X silicon gate, P-channel IK 
RAMs. At the same time, Rockwell announced 
that it had developed its own silicon gate, 
N-channel, 16-pin 4K RAM (P/N 1604-1) and 
that a 16-pin, 16K RAM is planned for intro- 
duction in 1976. 

The Synertek circuits complete Rockwell's 
family of 110 3A devices. The 1103A has a max- 
imum access time of 14-5 ns, while the 1103A-X 
is specified at 110 ns. In 100 to 999 quan- 
tities, prices are $9.70 and $11, respective- 
ly. Evaluation parts of the new devices will 
be available in June and should be in full 
production by late summer. 

The 4K RAM, P/N 1604-1, is pin compatible 
with Mostek's, Motorola's and Intel's 4K RAM. 
Evaluation parts are scheduled for August and 
production quantities by late 1975. 

Maximum access time for the 1604-1 is 
specified at 200 ns, and variations of the 
product will be available on the basis of 
speed and voltage characteristics. For 100 to 
999 quantities, the 1604-1 device is priced 
at $37.70. 

Washington pC Development Center 

Almac/Stroum Electronics, a Division of 
Laser Link Corp., has just announced the 
opening of its new Microcomputer Development 
Center. This facility will assist designers 
in developing the hardware and software for 
their microprocessor derived products, with- 
out incurring the capital cost of a prototy- 
ping system. 

Presently, the center contains the Intel 



Intellec 8/Mod 80 and the National IMP 16P/ 
308 prototyping systems. Each prototype sys- 
tem has its associated high-speed paper tape 
reader and teletypewriter. The inclusion of 
additional peripherals is planned for the 
future . 

Almax/Stroum also provides PROM program- 
ming using Data 1/0 PROM programmers. The 
development center is open daily and a vari- 
ety of utility packages are avialable. 

Process Control Compiler 

Warner £ Swassey is now offering a compi- 
ler for their "Process Control Language". 
The language was developed for use with their 
Comstar-4 process control system which uses 
the Intel 4004 microcomputer. 

The language is a translation for ladder 
diagrams and Boolean equations familar to 
process control engineers. Using the English 
language commands, the engineer can express 
on/off control functions in ladder-diagram 
terms and easily express most other control 
modes . 

The compiler converts the English language 
commands into source code and provides for 
machine language editing of the program. 

Memory And LSI Chip Test System 

Micro Control Co. has developed a new mem- 
ory and LSI test system, M-10A, for testing 
memory, microprocessors, LSI chips, memory 
boards and memory systems in production or 
engineering environments . 

The M-10A features crystal-controlled dig- 
ital timing with 1 ns resolution in the range 
from to 65 us. Up to nine clock phases and 
separate read/write timing are available. 
Operating at 10 MHz, the tester's internal 
8-bit microprocessor provides complete auto- 
matic test operation. 

The front panel controls include keyboard 
display and digital voltmeter. An optional 
keyboard display or teleprinter operation 
includes Schmoo plots; and test programs are 
stored on tape cartridges. 

Test jigs are available for memory chips, 
microprocessor chips and other LSI chips. 
The entire test system is available in either 
a benchtop or a floor model. 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408) 247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



12 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



New Back-Up Memory Assures Data 



Cambridge Memories' new MicroSTOR memories 
provide microprocessor and computer users 
with non-volatile, 100 us storage on 4K or 
8K cards in either 8- or 12--bit word sizes. 

MicroSTOR is a TTL compatible read/write 
system having its own storage, drivers, I/O 
registers and timing. It stores 4-096 or 8192 
words with 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12-bits per word. 
The storage is contained on four 2K x 12 
pluggable planes. 

The memory system's main function is to 
restore a computer's program in the event of 
a power failure or other such outages. When 
a computer system using the MicroSTORE has a 
program loaded into main memory, MicroSTOR 
automatically duplicates the data. Thus, if 
data is lost or altered in main memory from 
a power failure, MicroSTOR reloads the main 
computer's memory. 

Back-up applications for the MicroSTOR 
range from processing and point-of-sale term- 
inals, numerical control systems and data- 
logging devices, to eliminating the need for 
batteries, ROMs, or auxiliary storage such 
as floppy discs and cassettes. 

MicroSTOR can also operate as a main mem- 
ory if high-speed random-access searches are 
not required. Worst- case read/write time is 
400 ms. 

Pricing begins at $395 for the 8K x 12 
system and delivery is 30 days AR0. 

First Of New FPLA Generation 

Intersil has announced availability in 
production quantities of the IM5200, the 
first of a new generation of TTL programmable 
logic arrays (PLA) that can be electrically 
programmed in the field. 

The IM5200 has 14 inputs and eight open- 
collector outputs. It has a total of 48 
product terms and provides a complexity of 
more than 480 four-input logic gates. Pack- 
aged in a 24-pin ceramic dip and pin-compat- 
ible with the 7576 mask-programmable logic 
array, the device uses a single 5 V supply 
with typical propagation delays of 65 ns. 

Functionally, the IM5200 is equivalent to 
a collection of AND gates whose outputs can 
be selectively ORed. Since some functions 



may be more easily represented in their in- 
verted form, the output level is also pro- 
grammable to either a high or low active 
level. IM5200 programming is accomplished by 
Intersil's patented avalanche-induced-migra- 
tion process, in which switching transistors 
in the logic connection structure are elec- 
trically converted to diodes. 

Pricing begins at $37.50 in single unit 
quantity, plus a minimal programming charge. 

people, literature and events : 
Calif. Consultant Trade Association 

A new consultant trade association, PATCA, 
has been formed in the San Francisco Bay Area 
to promote consultant expertise for companies 
needing their services. Independent consul- 
tants (programmers, engineers, etc.) are in- 
vited to join the 80 member organization. 

Dennis Paull, president of the trade asso- 
ciation said PATCA will maintain a full time 
consultant referral service in which companies 
can call the association, state their need, 
and be referred to a member consultant quali- 
fied in that particular area. 

Annual membership is $20 per pe'rson and 
microcomputer consultants are welcome. Fur- 
ther information can be obtained by contact- 
ing PATCA. 

People On The Move 

JERRY CROSBY has rejoined the Systems 
Technology Division of Fairchild Camera £ 
Instrument Corp. as product marketing manager 
of small systems (Qualifier 901, etc.). 

RICHARD J. EAGAN has resigned his post as 
senior vice-president of Cambridge Memories , 
Inc. to join Intel as assistant general man- 
ager of the Memory Systems division. 

JIM GIBBONS, former Motorola M6800 product 
planner, has joined Ryan-McFarland as product 
manager for microcomputers . 

DON A. MITCHELL has been named president 
of the Microelectronics Group of Rockwell 
International Corp. 

WILLIAM E. WAGNER is now in charge of all 
Rockwell International's microprocessor and 
memory circuits as the new director of world- 
wide sales at the Microelectronic Device 
division. 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408) 247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



13 



Volume 1, Number 12/ June, 1975 



WILLIAM ROBERTS, senior vice-president of 
research and development for Western Digital 
Corp., has resigned. He is succeeded by LUKE 
DRU, director of engineering. 

M its-Mobile Tours West Coast 

Mits, Inc. has announced that they are 
touring the countryside exhibiting their 
Altair 8800 microcomputer in the Mits-Mobile 
van. The camper van is completely equipped 
with an Altair BASIC language system. In- 
1 eluded is an Altair computer, Comter termi- 
nal, ASR-33 teletypewriter, Altair Line 
Printer, ^Altair Floppy Disc and BASIC lan- 
guage . 

Individuals are invited to attend the free 
evening seminars . The seminars include de- 
monstrations and exhibits and emphasize basic 
computer concepts, BASIC language programming, 
and technical aspects of the Altair 8800. 
There are question and answer sessions and 
time given to hands-on experience. A special 
Altair discount will be offered to attendees. 
Contact Mits for seminar schedules in your 
area. 

WESCON 80 Per Cent Sold 

William C. Weber, recently named general 
manager of WESCON, said that 384 of the 480 
exhibit units were assigned this week to 233 
electronic firms. This is about 80% of the 
available display space. 

The show will run four days in the Brooks 
Hall exposition arena in San Francisco, CA 
from Sept. 16-19, 1975. Professional program 
sessions will be presented concurrently in 
the adjoining Civic Auditorium. 

This will be the 24th annual WESCON in 
California. WESCON is a non-profit activity, 
sponsored by the Los Angeles Council and San 
Francisco Bay Area Council of IEEE and the 
Northern and Southern California Chapters of 
the Electronic Representatives Association. 

Six Volume jjC Course Available 

Iasis Inc. has announced a unique concept 
in microcomputer education in the form of 
programmed self -teaching texts. The firm 
has completed work on an exhaustive six vol- 
uroe course that contains more than 700 pages 



of detailed, illustrated microcomputer infor- 
mation, including several programming and de- 
sign aids and more than 1,700 self- tests. 

The six volumes are Binary Arithmetic; 
Microcomputer Architecture; The 4-Bit Micro- 
computer; The 8-Bit Microcomputer; Assemblers 
and Prototyping Systems; and 8-Bit Assemblers 
and Compilers . 

The entire set of texts is priced at $124.50 
but orders submitted before June 30, 1975 
receive the special discounted price of $99.50. 
BankAmericard or Master Charge can be used. 

(Editor's Note: MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST will 
review the Iasis text set and feature the 
results in our Book Review section when com- 
pleted. ) 

Recent Literature 

"Exposing The Black Art Of Microprocessor 

Benchmarking" 

Robert H. Cushman, Special Features Editor 

EDN April 20, 1975 

EDN presents an excellent discussion of 
benchmark testing for evaluating microcom- 
puter performance. Robert Cushman dissects 
fivd benchmarks developed by AH Systems, Inc. 
for his analysis. He examines the strengths 
and weaknesses of each test to provide read- 
ers with insights for developing their own 
benchmark programs. The article concludes 
that there can be no industry standard bench- 
mark programs. Each user needs to compare 
microprocessors using his own custom set of 
benchmarks directed specifically to his own 
application. 

"Motor Control By PPL Can Be Achieved With A 

Microprocessor" 

Howard A. Raphael, Intel Corp. 

Electronic Design April 26, 1975 

A good discussion of motor controlling 
where software is used to replace the phase 
detector and the CPU clock provides the ac- 
curate timing. An example is discussed 
where the 4040 is used in a closed-loop sys- 
tem driving a small motor with an optical 
tachometer as the feedback. Error correction 
is also briefly discussed. 

(cont'd next page) 

# # # 
Make sure you receive your own personal copy 
each month by subscribing today. 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



14 



"Speed Microcomputer Multiplication" 
Herman Schmid, General Electric Co. 
Electronic Design 9 April 26, 1975 

In real-time applications, microcomputers 
may take too long to perform simple arithme- 
tic multiplication. Hence the author sug- 
gests using either external circuitry to com- 
plement the CPU or separate, peripheral mul- 
tipliers to overcome the speed limitations. 
The complementary circuit approach requires 
that the microprocessor be microprogrammable 
and have an externally accessible control 
bus. The required circuitry will, of course, 
be different for each micro. In his paper, 
Schmid details his design experience using 
National Semiconductor's IMP-16C micropro- 
cessor. 

"Benefits Of Localized Control With uC" 
Arthur D. Harmala, PCS 
Computer Design May 1975 

The cost and installation advantage of 
localized control using microcomputers is 
the main subject of this article. By example, 
the author shows how a process control sys- 
tem requiring 1100 and 3300 monitoring points 
can save 60.2% and 76.2%, respectively. This 
savings is primarily the result of fewer 
terminals, fewer cables and faster installa- 
tion times. Several other examples are pre- 
sented illustrating localized microcomputer 
control. A must article for those involved 
with digital control and automation systems . 

"Explore Microcomputer 1/0 Capabilities" 
Andre G. Vacroux, Bell Labs 
Electronic Design May 20, 1975 

This article reviews elementary concepts 
of I/O device servicing by a central proces- 
sor and provides examples of microprocessors 
which lend themselves to different I/O hand- 
ling techniques. 

The article surveys the capabilities and 
constraints implied by I/O bus structures, 
the availability of interrupt lines, and 
device addressing capabilities. The latter 
is shown to be constrained by the 1/0 in- 
struction format. 

The article highlights the need for sys- 
tem analysis, in terms of acceptable response 
time, data transfer rate, device priorities, 
and non-1/0 processor tasks, as part of mi- 
croprocessor selection for a particular ap- 
plication. 



Volume 1, Number 12/ June, 1975 



"Microprocessor Field 'Survey and Data Book" 
A H Systems Staff 

The first quarter's update of the A H Sys- 
tem's Microprocessor Field Survey and Data 
Book includes data sheets on 23 different 
products from 21 manufacturers. The data 
sheet format itself has been redesigned and 
significantly expanded. The architecture 
section of the data sheet now provides a 
reasonably complete picture of a processor's 
organization and capabilities. Of the nine 
newly reviewed microprocessors, four are 16- 
bit devices, three are 8-bit and two are 4- 
bit machines . 

"Markets For Computer Memories" 
Reference Report #292 
Frost £ Sullivan 

The market for memory systems will climb 
from $415 million in 1974 to $525 million in 
1975 and to $1 billion by 1983. Add-on mem- 
ories for mainframe computers will account 
for most of the growth, but the core and 
semiconductor memory component markets will 
soar from $478 million in 1974 to $851 mil- 
lion by 1978 and to $1.2 billion by 1983. 

From virtually no sales base at all, three 
years ago, microcomputer revenues will tally 
$500 million by 1978 and $1 billion by 1982. 
The study also notes that the memories for 
this market will greatly exceed the value of 
the microcomputers themselves. 

"Microprocessor Benchmarks : How Well Does 
The uP Move Data?" 

Robert Cushman, Special Features Editor 
EDN May 20, 1975 

This is EDN's second benchmark article 
and explores the uP's ability to move blocks 
of data. Robert Cushman explains A H Sys- 
tem's test in a step-by-step analysis com- 
paring both the Signetics 2650 and Motorola 
M6800 performances. The program basically 
initializes then executes a loop to move 
data through the CPU to a new memory location . 

The 2650 used the fewest instructions, 
four, as its all-in-one instructions automat- 
ically performed all loop housekeeping. 

The M6800 was tested twice, first to move 
data within a 256-byte page and then to move 
data from one page to another using the stack 
pointer. The M6800 performed . both tests 
faster than the 2650 (2\us and 19 us, res- 
pectively) but used more instructions. 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LI LLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



15 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



EDUCATION : 

MICROCOMPUTER COURSES, SEMINARS, CONFERENCES. 
Date, title, cost, location, sponsoring orga- 
nization (addresses on page 16). 



July 

1 



1- 4 



7-10 



7-11 



8-10 



14-16 



14-17 



14-17 



14-18 



14-18 



14-18 



15-17 



PROM Programming — A Systems Approach 
Free San Jose, CA Data I/O Corp. 

F8 Microcomputer Course $125 Dayton, 
OH Fairchild Semiconductor 

M6800 Microprocessor Course $430 
Detroit, MI Motorola, Inc. 

ICS International Microcomputer Educa- 
tional Congress $175-$425 Munich, 
Germany Integrated Computer Systems 

ICS International Microcomputer Educa- 
tional Congress $175-$425 San Diego, 
CA Integrated Computer Systems 

Microcomputer Series Training Course 
$375 Maynard, MA Digital Equipment 
Corp. 

M6800 Microprocessor Course $430 
North New Jersey Area Motorola, Inc. 

How To Profit From Microprocessors 
$35 Palo Alto, CA Pro-Log Corp. 

MCS-8080 Microcomputer Workshop $350 
Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 



Advanced Programming $395 
National Semiconductor 



Miami, FL 



Microprocessor Fundamentals $395 
Dallas, TX National Semiconductor 

Microprocessor Approach To System De- 
sign $375 Los Angeles, CA Univer- 
sity of California at Los Angeles 

Microprocessors — Hardware , Software , 
Applications $395-$445 Palo Alto, 
CA Opto-Logic Corp. 

Mini and Micro Computers : Their Appli- 
cations and Use $425 University of 
California at Berkeley 

M6800 Microprocessor Course $375 
Phoenix, AZ Motorola, Inc. 



15-18 

17-19 
21-23 
21-24 
21-24 
22-24 
22-25 

28-31 
28-31 

28- 1 



ICS International Microcomputer Educa- 
tional Congress $175-$425 Boston, 
MA Integrated Computer Systems 

PL/M Microcomputer Workshop $350 
Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 

MCS4/4040 Microcomputer Workshop $350 
Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 

IMP-16 PACE Applications $395 Dal- 
las, TX National Semiconductor 

Microprogramming $395 Miami, FL 
National Semiconductor 



M6800 Microprocessor Course $430 
Charlottesville, VA Motorola, Inc. 

ICS International Microcomputer Educa- 
tional Congress $175-$425 Dallas, 
TX Integrated Computer Systems 

Advanced Programming $395 Dallas, 
TX National Semiconductor 

Microprocessor Fundamentals $395 
Santa Clara, CA National Semiconduc- 
tor 

Microcomputer Systems Design I : Hard- 
ware, Software £ Applications $360 
Los Angeles, CA University of South- 
ern California 

28- 1 Mini and Microcomputers: Their Struc- 
tures, Characteristics and Applica- 
tions $300 Ann Arbor, MI Univer- 
sity of Michigan 

F8 Microcomputer Course $125 Dallas. 
TX Fairchild Semiconductor 



29-31 
29-31 
29-31 

August 
1 

4- 7 

4-8 



Microcomputer Design Course $300 
Palo Alto, CA Pro-Log Corp. 

M6800 Microprocessor Course $430 
Los Angeles, CA Motorola, Inc. 



PROM Programming — A Systems Approach 
Free San Jose, CA Data 1/0 Corp. 

IMP-16 PACE Applications $395 Santa 
Clara, CA National Semiconductor 

Advanced Computer Memory Technology 
$345 Los Angeles, CA University of 
Southern California 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408) 247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 

August 
4- 8 



16 



Volume 1, Number 12/ June, 1975 



Computer Architecture and Organization 
$345 Los Angeles, CA University of 
Southern California 

4- 8 Microcomputer Systems Design II: Ap- 

plications , Programming £ Implementa- 
tion — Through Actual Experience $375 
Los Angeles, CA University of South- 
ern California 

5- 7 M6800 Microprocessor Course $430 

Rochester, NY Motorola, Inc. 

5- 8 ICS International Microcomputer Educa- 
tional Congress $175-$425 Philadel- 
phia, PA Integrated Computer Systems 

11-13 MCS-8080 Microcomputer Workshop $350 
Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 

11-13 Microprogramming: Concepts, Trends 
and Applications $320 Washington, 
D.C. George Washington University 

11-14 Advanced Programming $395 Santa 
Clara, CA National Semiconductor 

11-14 Microprocessor Fundamentals $395 
Santa Clara, CA National Semicon- 
ductor 

11-15 Applications of Microprocessors and 
Digital Techniques to the Design of 
Control and Information Processing 
Systems $345 Los Angeles, CA 
University of Southern California 

11-15 Microprocessors — Hardware, Software, 
Applications $445 Newport Beach, CA 
Opto-Logic Corp. 

12-14 M6800 Microprocessor Course $430 
Tulsa, OK Motorola, Inc. 

PL/M Microcomputer Workshop $350 
Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 

MCS4/4040 Microcomputer Workshop $350 
Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 



14-16 



18-20 



18-21 



18-22 



19-21 



IMP-16 PACE Applications $395 
FL National Semiconductor 



Miami . 



Microcomputer Series Training Course 
$375 Maynard, MA Digital Equipment 
Corp. 

M6800 Microprocessor Course $430 
Washington/Baltimore Area Motorola 



25-28 



26-28 



26-28 



Advanced Programming $395 Miami, FL 
National Semiconductor 



M6800 Microprocessor Course 
Phoenix, AZ Motorola, Inc. 



$375 



2nd USA-Japan Computer Conference 
Tokyo, Japan AFIPS 



September 



MCS-8080 Microcomputer Workshop $350 
Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 



9-11 



M6800 Microprocessor Course $430 
Wichita, KS Motorola, Inc. 

11-13 PL/M Microcomputer Workshop $350 

Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 



12 



15-17 



16-18 



23-26 



How To Profit From Microprocessors 
$35 Palo Alto, CA Pro-Log Corp. 

MCS4/4040 Microcomputer Workshop $350 
Santa Clara, CA and Boston, MA Intel 



M6800 Microprocessor Course 
Dayton, OH Motorola, Inc. 



$430 



ICS International Microcomputer Educa- 
tional Congress $175-$425 Paris, 
France Integrated Computer ' Systems 

SPONSORING ORGANIZATIONS AND CONTACTS 



AFIPS, 210 Summit Ave. 
(201) 391-9810 



Data I/O Corp., 1376 N. 4th St 
CA 95112 (408) 287-8755 



Montvale, NJ 07645 
, San Jose, 



Digital Equipment Corp., Educational Services 
Group, Maynard, MA 01754 (617) 897-5111 

Fairchild Semiconductor, Microcomputer Train- 
ing Labs, 770 Welch Rd. , Suite 154, Palo Alto, 
CA 94304 (415) 327-2110 

George Washington University, Continuing 
Engineering Education, Washington, D.C. 
20052 (202) 676-6106 

Integrated Computer Systems, Inc., 4445 
Overland Ave., Culver City, CA 90230 (213) 
559-9265 

Intel Corp., Microcomputer Systems Training 
Program, 3065 Bowers Ave., Santa Clara, CA 
95051 (408) 246-7501 

Microcomputer Associates Inc., 10440 N. Tan- 
tau Ave . , Cupertino, CA 95014 (408) 247-8940 




PO BOX 1 167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408) 247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



17 



Volume 1, Number 12/ June, 1975 



Motorola M6800 Course, Ron Bishop, BB102, 
P. 0. Box 2953, Phoenix, AZ 85062 (602) 
962-2345 

National Semiconductor Corp., 2900 Semicon- 
ductor Dr., Santa Clara, CA 95051 (408) 
732-5000 

Opto-Logic Corp., 3450 E. Spring St., Long 
Beach, CA 90806 (213) 595-1631 

Pro- Log Corp., 852 Airport Rd., Monterey, CA 
93940 (408) 372-4593 

University of California at Berkeley, Conti- 
nuing Education in Engineering, UC Extension, 
2223 Fulton St., Berkeley, CA 94720 (415) 
642-4151 

University of California at Los Angeles Ex- 
tension, 10995 Le Conte Ave., Los Angeles, 
CA 90024 (213) 825-3344 

University of Michigan, Eric M. Aupperle, 
Continuing Engineering Education, 300 Chrys- 
ler Center — North Campus, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 

University of Southern California, Continu- 
ing Engineering Education, Powell Hall 212, 
University Park, Los Angeles, CA 90007 
(213) 746-6708 



FINANCIAL: 








Earnings 








Fairchild 


1975 


1974 


% 


Mar. 30 








Share Earnings 


$.62 


$1.97 


-68.5 


Earnings 


3,255K 


10,412K 


-68.7 


Sales 


71.728K 


108,695K 


-34 


Western Digital 


1975 


1974 


% 


Mar. 31 








Share Earnings 


$.00 


$.17 





Earnings 


-752K 


230K 


-426.8 


Sales 


2 , 844K 


2,923K 


-2.7 


9 Months 








Share Earnings 


$.00 


$.85 





Earnings 


-1,458K 


1,147K 


-122.7 


Sales 


8,399K 


8,216K 


+2.2 



1976 jjC Market To Reach $120 Million 

In an exclusive interview with the English 
electronic newspaper, Electronics Weekly, 
Harvey Cragon, Texas Instrument's micropro- 
cessor strategy manager, pegged the 1976 mi- 
crocomputer and memory market to hit $120 
million. Cragon said that TI defines micro- 
processors as one of the top three signifi- 
cant areas for multi-million dollar develop- 
ment. The major area for this expansion 
would come in the consumer market, especially 
in home appliances and automobiles . Cragon 
also believes the European interest in micro- 
computers is just as intense as the U.S. 

Shugart & National In Disc Deal 

National Semiconductor has signed an agree- 
ment with Shugart Associates for $2 million of 
floppy discs. The discs will be used in 
National's new line of IMP-16 microprocessor 
Disc Operation Systems (MDOS— see MICROCOM- 
PUTER DIGEST, Feb. 1975). 

Shugart will begin deliveries immediately 
on the dual-drive disc systems that have a 
capacity in excess of 5 mega-bits of storage 
for system software and application programs . 

CA Slash Memory & jjP Prices 

With the recent incorporation of IK, 4K 
and 8K MOS RAM memories, Computer Automation 
has announced reduced prices of 20-35% for 
their Naked Milli and LSI microcomputers . 

The Naked Milli with IK x 16 RAM is now 
selling for $489, a 4K system is priced at 
$616 and an 8K configuration for $941. 4K 
and 8K versions of the LSI-11 microcomputers 
have been reduced to $1,679 and $2,036, res- 
pectively. 

All prices are based on OEM quantities of 
100. Computer Automation said the reductions 
were not across-the-board reductions on all 
their products, but only reflected lower RAM 
costs from suppliers and the switch from 
core to semiconductor memories in the LSI-11 
microcomputer . 

# # # # 



PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 




MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



18 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



COMPANY ADDRESSES FOR THIS ISSUE : 

A H Systems, Inc., 9710 Cozycroft Ave., Chats- 
worth, CA 91311 (213) 99 8-0223 

Almac/Stroum Electronics, A Division of Laser 
Link Corp., 5811 6th Ave. S., Seattle, WA 
98108 (206) 763-2300 

American Microsystems Inc. , 3800 Homestead 
Rd., Santa Clara, CA 95051 (408) 246-0330 

Applied Computing Technology, 17815 Sky Park 
Circle, Irvine, CA 92664 (714) 549-3123 

Applied Data Communications, 1509 E. McFadden 
Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92705 (714) 547-6954 

Bell £ Howell, 360 Sierra Madre Villa, Pasa- 
dena, CA 91109 (213) 796-9381 

Bourns, Inc., 1200 Columbia Ave., Riverside, 
CA 92500 (714) 684-1700 

Cambridge Memories, 285 Newton Ville Ave., 
Newtonville, MA 02160 (617) 271-6503 

Chrysler Motor Corp., P. 0. Box 857, Detroit, 
MI 48231 (313) 956-5252 

Computer Automation, 18651 Von Karman Ave., 
Irvine, CA 92664 (714) 833-8830 

Conrac Corp., 600 N. Rimsdale Ave., Covina, 
CA 91722 (213) 966-3511 

Danyl Corp . , 86 Tanner St . , Haddonf ield , NJ 
08033 (609) 429-1331 

Electronic Engineering Co. of California, 
1441 E. Chestnut Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92701 
(714) 835-6000 

E S L Instruments, Derby, CT 06418 (203) 
735-8774 

Fairchild Integrated Circuits Group, 464 
Ellis St., Mountain View, CA 94042 (415) 
962-3816 

Frost S Sullivan, Inc., 106 Fulton St., 
New York, NY 10038 (212) 233-1080 

Guili Microprocessing, Inc., P. 0. Box 24186, 
San Jose, CA 95154 (408) 292-8058 

Hydra Corp., 2218 Old Middlefield Way, Moun- 
tain View, CA 94043 (415) 964-9135 

Iasis, Inc., 770 Welch Rd. , Suite 154, Palo 
Alto, CA 94304 (415) 329-0110 



Intersil, 10900 N. Tantau Ave., Cupertino, 
CA 95014 (408) 257-5450 

Intertec Data Systems Corp., 1851 Interstate 
85, S. Charlotte, NC 28208 (704) 377-0300 

Intel Corp., 3065 Bowers Ave., Santa Clara, 
CA 95051 (408) 246-7501 

Macrodata Corp., 6203 Variel Ave., Woodland 
Hills, CA 91364 (213) 887-5550 

Microcomputer Associates Inc., 10440 N. Tan- 
tau Ave., Cupertino, CA 95014 (408) 247-8940 

Micro Control Co., 1364 Buchanoh PI., Colum- 
bia Heights, MN 55421' (612) 781-2612 

Mits, Inc., 6328 Linn N.E., Albuquerque, .NM 
87108 (505) 265-7553 

Monolithic Systems Corp., 14 Inverness Dr.E., 
Englewood, CO 80110 (303) 761-2275 

Mostek Corp., 1215 W. Crosby Rd. , Carrollton, 
TX 75006 (214) 242-0444 

Motorola Semiconductor, P. 0. Box 2953, 
Phoenix, AZ 85062 (602) 244-4826 

National Semiconductor Corp., 2900 Semicon- 
ductor Dr., Santa Clara, CA 95051 (408) 
732-5000 

PATCA, 2680 Bayshore Frontage Rd., Suite 411, 
Mountain View, CA 94043 (415) 961-1155 

PCS, G-4025 S. Center Rd., Flint, MI 48507 
(313) 744-0225 

Pro-Log Corp., 852 Airport Rd., Monterey, CA 
93940 (408) 372-4593 

Pulsecom, Division of Harvey Hubbell, Inc., 
5714 Columbia Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041 
(703) 820-0652 

RCA Solid State Division, Box 3200, Route 2, 
Somerville, NJ 08876 (201) 722-3200 

Rockwell International, 3370 Miraloma Ave., 
Anaheim, CA 92803 (213) 647-5000 

Shugart Associates, 1030F E. Dwain Ave., 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (408) 738-2524 

Signetics Corp., 811 East Arques Ave., Sunny- 
vale, CA 94086 (408) 739-7700 

Synertek, 3050 Coronado Dr., Santa Clara, CA 
95051 (408) 241-4300 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



MICROCOMPUTER DIGEST 



19 



Volume 1, Number 12 / June, 1975 



Texas Instruments, P. 0. Box 5012, Dallas. 
TX 75222 (214) 238-2011 



Warner £ Swasey Co., Comstar Division, 30300 
Solon Industrial Pkwy. 
(216) 368-6200 



, Solon, OH 44139 



Zeno Systems, Inc., Santa Monica, CA 90400 



MICROCOMPUTER STUDIES AVAILABLE : 

EDN Microprocessor Design Series $6.95 
Microprocessor Reprints, EDN Magazine, 221 
Columbus Ave., Boston, MA 02116 

Microcomputer Design, Systems and Hardware 
for the 8008, 8080 $100 Martin Research 
Ltd., 1825 S. Halsted St., Chicago, IL 60608 
(312) 829-6932 

Microcomputer Digest $28 

Microcomputer Structures $25 100 pages 
Microcomputer Associates Inc., 10440 N. Tan- 
tau Ave., Cupertino, CA 95014 (408) 247-8940 

Microprocessor Field Survey S Data Book $495 
for first copy, $55 each additional copy. 
A H Systems, Inc., 9710 Cozycroft Ave., Chats- 
worth, CA 91311 (213) 998-0223 

Microprocessor Handbook $24.95 Texas In- 
struments, P. 0. Box 5012, Dallas, TX 75222 
(214) 238-2011 

Minicomputer & Microcomputer $595 
Industrial Market for Microcomputers $445 
Lucy Hendry, Frost £ Sullivan, Inc. , 106 Ful- 
ton St., New York, NY 10038 (212) 223-1080 

Programmed Learning Course on Microcomputers 
$99.50 Six volume set, Iasis Inc. , 770 
Welch Rd., Suite 154, Palo Alto, CA 94304 
Bob Warr (408) 329-0110 



EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES : 

MOTOROLA SEMICONDUCTOR is looking for two 
individuals to fabricate new product defini- 
tions for new microprocessor families and 
application support for M6800. Should have 
hardware and software capability with mar- 
keting charisma and be willing to relocate 
to Austin, TX. Send resumes to Van Lewing, 
Motorola, P. 0. Box 2953, Phoenix, AZ 85062 



MICROCOMPUTER PRODUCTS/SERVICES : 

STANDARD SET OF MICROCOMPUTER BUILDING BLOCKS 
consisting of CPU (8080 uP), RAM, ER0M, I/O, 
Parallel 1/0 and Analog Input. Logical Ser- 
vices, Inc., 1901 Old Middlefield Way, Suite 
17, Mountain View, CA 94043 (415) 965-8365 

TYMSHARING SERVICES for Intel and Motorola 
uP. $5 per hour for connect time; no royal- 
ties or CPU charges. IOC per sector /mo. 
storage chg. Guili Microprocessing Inc., 
Box 24186, San Jose, CA 95154 (408) 292-8058 

MICROCOMPUTER DEVELOPMENT CENTER, Intellec 
8/80, TTY, technical support. Sorrento Val- 
ley Group, 11339-K Sorrento Valley Rd., San 
Diego, CA 92121 (714) 452-0101 

MICROCOMPUTER-BASED custom product develop- 
ment, hardware, software, production, publi- 
cations available. Send for free price list. 
Microcomputer Associates Inc. , 10440 N. Tan- 
tau Ave., Cupertino, CA 95014 (408) 247-8940 

EUROMICRO — The European Association for Mi- 
croprocessing, quarterly newsletter covering 
activities of interest in microprocessing. 
Annual membership $7. Rodney Zaks , Chairman, 
Universite de Technologie Compiegne, BP233, 
60206 Compiegne, France. 

DOS DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM, Intellec 8/80, floppy 
disc , hardware error checks , interface kit , 
12K RAM required, $4250. Millennium Infor- 
mation Systems, 420 Mathew St., Santa Clara, 
CA 95050 (408) 243-6652 

MICRO SYSTEMS SOFTWARE, 355 W. Olive #216, 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (408) 735-1650. George 
Fraine, Richard Ware. uP system support pro- 
grams (assemblers, simulators, etc.). Engi- 
neering applications programming for uC. 

RIGHTS AVAILABLE to general purpose system 
for debugging microprocessor-based hardware. 
Also product development service. Arthur D. 
Little , Inc . , Acorn Park , Cambridge , MA 
02140 (617) 864-5770 (X2361) 

MICROCOMPUTER SOFTWARE, specializing in resi- 
dent assemblers, high-level languages and 
applications for small uC systems . Sam Hol- 
land, 1114 Abby Wood Ct. , Los Gatos, CA 95030 
(408) 378-3460 




PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408) 247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor. 



IBouno auiii 





0V68L\fZ (80fr) • *l096V0'ONI±y3dn0 'L911 XOQ Od 



*M i 








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PO BOX 1167, CUPERTINO, CA 95014 • (408)247-8940 

Copyright © 1975 by Microcomputer Associates Inc., All Rights Reserved. M.R. Lemas, President. Published monthly. Subscription 
$28.00 per year, overseas $40.00 per year. DARRELL D. CROW, Editor; LILLIAN LAU, Associate Editor; PATRICIA L. DREISBACH, 
Circulation Editor; RAY HOLT, Applications Technical Advisor; MANNY LEMAS, Applications Technical Advisor.